When it Comes to Sweets, You Can’t Cheat the System


Do you know the story of aspartame? It was discovered by accident in 1965 by a chemist named James Schlatter, who was working on developing an anti-ulcer drug. He came across aspartame during his re-search, licked his finger without thinking, and realized it tasted sweet like sugar. Eventually the brand NutraSweet (basically aspartame) because popular, especially among people who were trying to limit their sugar consumption or lose weight. They blindly believed the NutraSweet marketing machine that this product was healthier for them than sugar. But soon (as early as the 1980s), evidence started emerging that suggested aspartame is actually quite toxic to humans. Here’s what the chemical breakdown of aspartame looks like in our bodies:

Methanol, which comes from aspartame, gets released into the small intestine once it comes into contact with the enzyme chymotrypsin. Then the methanol gets converted into formaldehyde, which then gets converted into formic acid. Formic acid is toxic! In fact, formic acid is used to strip epoxy and urethane coatings. You wouldn’t lick glue or varnish, so why would you pop aspartame into your mouth?

Today, tons of health problems have been associated with aspartame, including abdominal pain, arthritis, asthma, edema, blood sugar control problems, brain cancer, burning urination, depression, diarrhea, hearing loss, thinning of hair, menstrual problems, memory loss, muscle spasms, seizures, vertigo, vision loss, weight gain. Basically, everything! Though you may not have known all the details about aspartame, you probably have heard along the way that it’s bad for you and likely switched to some other allegedly healthier artificial sweetener, right?

Maybe you’re into sucralose, or Splenda. Or maybe you have discovered erythritol or xylitol? Or maybe stevia or sorbitol? Or maybe you’re digging some other product that told you it was organic and healthy and all-natural? Basically, if you’re like most people, you probably just decided to listen to the message the company told you about their product being healthier than sugar.

Sorry to all those with a sweet toothed folks out there, but you might have been duped. Just like NutraSweet duped us all in the 1980s. At least, a new study published in the British Medical Journal (https://www.bmj.com/content/364/bmj.k4718) says you might have been tricked. The study, which looked at 56 individual studies about non-sugar sweeteners that included close to 14,000 people, concluded there’s absolutely no evidence that these allegedly healthier sweeteners are any better for your health than plain old sugar. Some of the health issues the researchers looked at included changes in weight, body mass index, oral health, eating behavior, cancer, heart disease, kidney disease and mood swings associated with sugar and non-sugar sweeteners.

While the results of the study don’t tell us whether artificial sweeteners are even worse than sugar, as is the case with aspartame, the various types of non-sugar sweeteners also don’t present any evidence that they’re healthier than sugar, said the researchers. Our best advice: Get off the fake sugar right away! And avoid other sugar most of the time (yes this includes honey, syrups and agave). Depending on your goals and how your body responds to sugar, you probably want to avoid eating too much fruit, too, especially too much dried fruit like figs and dates. But but but, here’s the good news for you sweet tooth sugar addicts: Although you want to avoid sugar most of the time, it’s OK to treat yourself here and there to some-thing sweet. We’ll forgive you. Just return to no sugar the next day.

How We’re Different Than the Other Gyms


Generally, a gym experience comes in one of three forms:

 

  1. Globo gym:This is the big box, community center style of gym. Generally, you pay between $20 and $100 a month for the use of the equipment and you can workout on your own time and at your own leisure.
  2. Group Exercise facility: You pay to attend group exercise classes, be it bootcamp, yoga classes, spin classes, CrossFit classes, pilates, Orange Theory etc. Typically, you pay somewhere in the neighborhood of $100 to $180 a month for unlimited classes, or you buy a punch-pass for $20 a pop.
  3. Personal Training Studio: You work predominantly with a coach in a one-on-one environment, and pay anywhere from $75 to $120 an hour for personalized coaching (often $1,000 + a month).

 

We are NONE of the above. But before we get into what we do, let’s take a look at some of the pros and cons of the above three types of gyms.

 

 

 

Globo Gym:

Pros: Memberships are typically quite inexpensive, and if you’re experienced, fit, healthy, injury-free and comfortable in the gym, you can follow a program that caters to your needs and goals and you will see real fitness results.

Cons: You receive little to no guidance from a coach, so more often than not members aren’t working on the things they need to be working on to reach their health, fitness and body composition goals. And because there’s no accountability to stick to your commitment to fitness—nobody reaches out if you stop showing up—members often fall off the wagon, yet continue to pay their membership dues because the fee is small enough they barely realize the money is trickling out of their bank account. Thus, most people don’t see results and don’t stick around. Further, the vibe tends to be quite anti-social; people show up with headphones on and listen to music as they grind it out on their own, not speaking or connecting with anyone around them. In other words, there’s no feeling of community in most Globo gyms.

 

 

 

Group Exercise Facility

Pros: Training in a group is fun, social, competitive and motivating. There’s often a strong feeling of community and people make lasting friendships with other likeminded, health conscious individuals. While more expensive than a community center membership, fees are still much more affordable than personal training studios.

Cons: You’re fitness is generally done in a group environment, so there’s little to no individual programming or coaching. This means your personal weaknesses, limitations, injuries, let alone wants, needs and goals, aren’t addressed: You’re at the mercy of the group, as opposed to what you need as an individual. This leads to injuries and/or low accountability to one’s fitness. (Generally, when fitness is done via group exercise classes alone, annual churn rate among members is 70 percent, meaning 7 out of 10 members don’t last even one year in this environment).

 

 

 

Personal Training Studio:

Pros: You receive personalized care from a professional coach, who caters to your individual goals, wants and needs. This personal coaching helps you achieve fitness goals and reduces your chance of injury. Accountability also tends to be high because you have an appointment with a coach, who you have an actual relationship with, and are paying a premium to be there.

Cons: It’s expensive (often completely unaffordable for many) and lacks a sense of community. When you speak to people who go to a personal training studio, they often reveal they only know one person in the whole gym: Their personal coach. Thus, it’s challenging to forge a community support network at a personal training studio.

 

 

 

Enter 7 Mile Strength & Fitness: The impetus behind what we do is to combine the pros from all of the above models, while ditching the cons!

From a practical standpoint, here’s what it looks like:

 

Step 1: Fundamentals

You will get paired up with a coach your feel your connect with—someone you trust with your long term health and fitness needs.

You begin by doing an introductory session with this coach, followed by approximately 10-20 personal training sessions (depending on your individual needs). These sessions help identify your current fitness level, your injury history, your strengths and weaknesses and your fitness and body composition goals. Based on the above, you will be given a toolkit to help prepare you to be successful in group classes.

 

Step 2: Hybrid Membership

Once you’re prepared, you will graduate to group classes and will begin a combination of weekly group classes (two to five classes per week), plus periodic personal training sessions with your personal coach. The frequency with which you meet your coach depends on your goals, needs and budget, but is generally once a week, once as month, once every six months or once a quarter. These sessions will help keep you on track with your goals, and will also provide an opportunity to address what’s working and what’s not working in classes, so you can adjust accordingly to ensure your continued progress.

 

 

 

As a result, we believe our hybrid model provides you with all that is required to be successful in health and fitness, including:

  1. A personal coach to cater to your individual needs so you actually see fitness results.
  2. A community-based, social environment, where you’ll feel a sense of belonging to a supportive community of friends.
  3. Financially affordable.

Contact us for more.

Athlete of the MonthJanuary

Sandra Castelo

Years Doing CrossFit: 2

*

How long have you been doing CrossFit?

2 years and 4 months.

 

What made you decide to give 7 Mile Strength & Fitness a try?

Even though my husband (Jeff ‘Jefe’ Kelly) had been a long time member and had nothing but good things to say about the gym and the community, I didn’t think CrossFit was for me given my lower back problems.  What made me change my mind was when Jeff suggested I do some personal training sessions with Coach Chris.

 

What was the hardest part when you started and how did you overcome that?

Having the courage to walk though the door.  I was so out of shape and I had no experience in weightlifting… CrossFit was going to be a humbling experience!  But somehow within minutes, those feelings dissipated because I was learning and having a great time.

Equally as difficult was the fact that I was coming to CrossFit WITH a chronic injury.  For 15 years, I tried to find a solution to my lower back problems and regardless of who I went to (doctor, physio, chiro, therapist, specialist) nobody seemed to have a solution other than to minimally help me manage the pain. Getting the opportunity to work with Chris changed everything – I gained my quality of life back!

 

With January being the beginning of the year are there any new goals set for 2019?  Did you conquer any goals set for 2018?

Back in June, I decided to give myself a fun challenge: 100 unbroken double-unders by December.  Reached my goal with a month to spare!  Time for a new challenge in 2019: handstand walk by June.  I did the Handstand Club with Coach Julia last year and I left equipped with the knowledge required to accomplish that goal but needing more practice.  This is my chance to make it happen!

 

Open Gym is a time we quite often see you in practicing skill work and doing ROM WOD. How has that been beneficial for you? 

Open Gym sessions are the perfect opportunity to work on movements and exercises that were prescribed to me by Chris during my monthly PT to address an issue or a weakness.  I also use that time to work on my challenges (see question above) and I’ll usually do a ROM WOD at the end of the session. The perfect combo of strength, skills and flexibility!

 

Any new places to travel on your list for 2019? 

Trying to decide between Greece or Portugal for our summer trip.

 

Did you play any sports growing up?

I figure skated for 17 years and competed in synchronised skating for the last 10.  I was lucky to represent Canada at several international competitions for many years and even made it to the World Championships!

 

Anything people at 7 Mile Strength & Fitness don’t know about you?

I was born in Montreal but my parents are from Spain so I have dual citizenship. I went to French school during the week, Spanish school on weekends, and learned English watching Fresh Prince of Bel Air.

 

Anything crazy on your bucket list? (bungee jumping, sky diving?)

Nothing adrenaline driven on my bucket list – my bucket list is filled with places to see and skills to develop like learning to play the piano.

 

What is your favorite WOD and why?

I don’t really have a favorite… they are all just different variations of pain!

 

What is your least favorite WOD and why?

Any workouts that require a lot of arm strength because my “chicken wings” can’t keep up!

 

What has been your biggest surprise about doing CrossFit?

The people and coaches. 7 Mile Strength and Fitness has such a welcoming, supportive, fun and motivating group of coaches and it is evidenced by the amazing camaraderie amongst members.

 

Would you recommend 7 Mile Strength & Fitness to others and if so, why?

Without hesitation – for the quality of coaching, the awesome friendships and the range of services offered.

 

Thanks Sandra, we are proud to have you as our January 7 Miler.

The Protein and Weight Loss Connection


 

When people think about protein supplementation, they often think about its role in building and repairing muscle and, of course, it’s ability to help you gain lean muscle mass. And maybe even its alleged role in helping you bulk up? Clients often approach ask various questions about supplementing with protein, via shakes, or otherwise. The most common questions are: When’s the best time to have a protein shake? Will it help me pack on muscle? Or the flipside—often from scared females who don’t want to get “bulky”—Am I going to bulk up?

 

 

Less frequently, though, do we talk about protein’s ability to help you actually lose weight. If a new pilot study is at all accurate—the study was conducted by researchers from three American universities and published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition this year—then it might be worth taking protein to help your body become more efficient, and ultimately help you lose weight. Here’s a link to the study: (https://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12970-018-0263-6

 

 

Although we often think we need to take protein right after a workout for recovery, this study looked at the effects of taking a pre-workout protein supplement. The researchers discovered that when the participants (who were male in this case) fasted and then took protein—25 g of whey protein isolate or 25 g of casein protein 30 minutes before a medium-intensity treadmill workout—they had higher post-workout energy expenditure compared to both the group who took 25 g of carbohydrates (maltodextrin) before their workout and the non-caloric control group.

 

 

 

What does this mean exactly? Well, a higher post-workout energy expenditure has frequently been linked to both weight loss and fat oxidization, which basically means their ability to burn fat. Also notable is that those who took casein protein had even better results than the whey protein group. The researchers were also hoping to see if protein before exercise might also minimize protein degradation during exercise, but more research is needed to see if this is the case, they reported. 

 

 

 

Though this was just a pilot study, it’s certainly not the first evidence of protein consumption being linked to weight loss. A 2012 study, for example, published in the Nutrition Journal (https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-11-105) looked at whether taking extra proteins and amino acids through a liquid shake would help elderly, obese people lose weight. The result: Those who took the protein supplement actually lost more fat than those who didn’t. They believe this is because protein requires the greatest caloric cost for digestion (when compared to fat and carbohydrates), so more protein might actually assist in weight loss even if it means consuming more calories overall. Interesting stuff…

 

 

 

For what it’s worth, from a personal anecdotal evidence-based standpoint, in the years we have been involved in the fitness industry helping people get fit and become leaner through diet and exercise, we will say without a doubt that increasing protein in your diet, be it through regular food or a supplement, usually leads to a leaner body composition. Period. Bulking up requires (for most people) a TON of time lifting weights and pounding way more protein than most people are willing to eat. For the average person, however, consuming more protein (and reducing carbs) won’t make them bulky. Instead, they usually feel better and look leaner. So if that’s your goal, talk to us about your protein intake today.

 

 

 

 

 

Start the New Year in a Cleaner, Better Place Than You Ended the Last Year


Food comas, wine hangovers and lazy Netflix days spent inside sipping Baileys in your morning coffee. OK, maybe a walk in the snow here and there, but then back inside for cookies and rum and eggnog. T’is the season to undo all the gains you made in the last year, right? Ask yourself, “Is it really worth it?”

 

 

If it is, by all means be jolly and let yourself go for a month, but if you find yourself whimpering the days away in regret and depression come January and planning New Year’s resolutions you kind of know you won’t honor, then do it differently this drinking season.

 

 

Here’s the thing: We truly believe you can have it all. You can enjoy your favorite holiday snack and drinks without losing your fitness routine, without suffering during workouts in January, and without packing on any pounds. It just takes a little bit of effort. Here are some tips that will help you feel like you still have it all!

 

 

 

Wake Up, Pee, Brush Teeth, Get Coffee, WORKOUT!

The biggest reason people fall of their workout routine during this time is because they employ the “I’ll workout this evening,” or “this afternoon,” or “after breakfast” workout plan. Then comes a big brunch with holiday punch and suddenly working out doesn’t seem like a priority anymore.

 

Instead, workout first thing in the morning, immediately after your morning routine. Do it before you shower and feel too clean to workout, and before you eat breakfast and feel too full to move. It’ll be the best emotional high you get all day and it’ll make you feel less guilty when you show up to brunch and eat all the food and punch.

 

 

 

No Gym, No Problem

If you go out of town during this time, here are three bodyweight workouts that will get your blood flowing and are relatively mentally manageable, and that you can do in just 10-foot-by-10-foot of space:

 

1.Every 30 seconds x 7 minutes: 4-8 burpees.

The faster you get your intended number of burpees done, the more rest you will get. Try a lower number first, and once you feel comfortable with it, increase your number. It’s a great way to log 50 to 100 burpees in a less painful way than doing 100 burpees for time.

 

2. Tabata Mash-up:

You can do this with various bodyweight movements, like air squats, push-ups, hollow rocks, hollow holds, burpees, lunges, planks, side planks.

Choose 3 movements and rotate them, working for 20 seconds and resting for 10 seconds for 12 to 16 minutes. Once again, this is a great way to pack in a lot of volume that also allows you to rest, making it easier to handle mentally (most people find) than a “3, 2, 1 go” for time workout.

 

3. Stairs!

Staying in a hotel with stairs? Climb up and down them (run if you’re really into it) and do 1 to 5 burpees at each landing.

 

 

 

 

Handling Holiday Feasts

We have often heard the advice that you should eat before you go to a holiday party so you don’t show up hungry. From our experience, all that does it make you eat more because the food there is likely super tasty that you won’t be able to stop yourself. That being said, don’t show up famished and fasted, but go hungry ish. Here are our top three tips: The 3 Ps!

1.Plate: We often walk around at parties picking at appetizers not realizing how much we’re actually eating, as we’re eating small bites. But by the end of the night, all those small bites add up into way more calories than you ever would have eaten in one sitting. Instead, grab a pate and fill it, or half fill it, to help you monitor how much you’re actually consuming.

2.Protein: Protein fills you up, so definitely get your usual amount of protein in you to help you avoid all the carbs, carbs, carbs.

3.Positioning: Position yourself in the room far away from the food table. Hopefully the engrossing conversations you’re having will be enough to stop you from picking at the food long after you are satiated.

 

 

 

 

Small Changes in January

Sometimes making plans for the new year is as discouraging as the fitness you lost in December. Often this is because we come up with large, and sometimes unrealistic, goals for the new year.

 

This year, try something new. Instead of massive change, consider making one small change—creating one new manageable habit—each month. This can be as simple as drinking a glass of water the moment you wake up so you don’t feel so famished for breakfast. Once that becomes habit, then build in a new small habit the following month. Keep track of these change (write them down), and before you know it you will have created 12 new, healthy habits that become your new normal, as opposed to one giant resolution you make in January and abandon by February.

 

All that being said, enjoy yourself and your favourite cookies and traditions this Christmas. But keep it reasonable and start 2019 in a better place you ended 2018.

Sneaky Foods That Have You Eating More Sugar Than You Thought


If you’re someone who’s following the ketogenic diet and not counting the grams of sugar foods on your daily carb (and sugar) count, chances are you’re eating more grams of carbs than you think! If you’re eating more than 100g of carbs per day, that’s not keto! A true ketogenic diet means eating around 10 percent carbohydrates only.  Some foods have carbs – especially grams of sugar –  that you might be forgetting to track if you’re counting your macros, or are just trying to eat a low or no-sugar diet. This information may also be helpful if you’re trying twitch your sugar intake during this holiday season.

 

Let’s take a look at some of the unexpected sugar culprits:

 

Milk:

All these years you thought it was better to put milk in your coffee or tea instead of heavy cream to avoid the fat…

If you’re trying to avoid sugar, this is the wrong approach.

A quick sugar glimpse:

· 8 oz. of skim milk, 1 percent milk and 2 percent milk have approximately 12 grams of sugar

· 8 oz. of half-and-half has 0.2 grams of sugar

· 8 oz. of heavy cream has 0.1 grams of sugar (most brands list this as 0 g of sugar)

Thus, if you’re trying to avoid sugar and not fat, stick to cream over milk. Try 33 or 36 percent cream: It’s delicious and sugar-free.

 

 

Nuts:

Another place the sinfully sneaky sugar is found are in nuts. Here’s a lit of various nuts, along with how much sugar each type contains per 100 grams.

Almonds: 3.9 g
Brazil nuts: 2.3 g
Pecans: 4 g
Walnuts: 2.6 g
Peanuts (not a real nut): 4 g
Cashews: 6 g
Macademia: 4.6 g
Hazelnuts (also known as filberts): 4.3 g
Pistachio: 8 g

So by this standard, it’s best to avoid pistachio nuts and stick with walnuts and brazil nuts.

Another tip, if you’re buying nut butters, check the ingredients list and make sure there’s no added sugar.

 

 

Sauces:

You have probably heard this one before, but from store-bought salad dressings to canned tomatoes and tomato paste, you’re probably getting way more sugar than you realize.

A simple option for a salad dressing that takes three minutes to make and is sugar-free: Olive oil, balsamic vinegar (not a balsamic reduction: those have a ton of sugar), lime or lemon juice, salt, pepper, garlic powder and oregano. Boom.

Here’s another big one: Tomato sauce! Usually the store-bought ones have a surprising amount of sugar. Believe it or not, it’s pretty easy to make your own.

Homemade tomato sauce: Saute onions and garlic until super soft (10-15 minutes). Add tomatoes and some water (or sugar-free broth) and let simmer. Then go nuts on spices like salt, pepper, dried or fresh basil and/or oregano, parsley, chilli powder, paprika, and cayenne pepper, if you’re into spice. Cook on medium heat for a good 20 minutes and then throw it all in a food processor and puree until smooth. If you want a creamy tomato sauce, just dump in half a cup or so of heavy cream once it’s all pureed. Or if it needs thinning out, add some water or broth. It will taste better than any store-bought tomato sauce and is, of course, sugar-free.

 

 

Booze:

We all know booze has sugar, but let’s take a look at the better and worse ones in terms of sugar content:

Wine: Obviously it depends on the type of wine, but even some dry white wines can contain as much as 10 grams of sugar per 5 oz. glass, and most people drink more than 5 ounces. The sweeter reds and whites go up from there in terms of sugar content. Some dry reds and whites, however, do contain as little as 1 gram of sugar, so do your research and select those with less sugar.

Bubbly: Again, it depends on the type, but most champagne and proseccos have around 5 g of sugar per glass.

Fortified wines: These are the ones to avoid (think port or sherry or marsala). They can have as much as 150 g of sugar per litre. Something else to avoid: Mulled wine! Sometimes it has as much as 11 tsp. of sugar per glass.

Beer: While beer doesn’t contain much, if any sugar, it does has a lot of carbohydrate grams, usually in the 10 to 15 g of carbohydrates per 12 ounces of beer.

Cider: Let’s just go ahead and ban cider right now. Many ciders have as much as 20 grams of sugar per 500 mL of cider. That’s around 6 tsp. of sugar! And it’s pretty easy to guzzle 500 mL of delicious and refreshing apple cider.

Whiskey/Scotch: Better choice than beer and cider. Whiskey has little to no carbs or sugar. Things are looking up!

Gin: Winner, winner chicken dinner. Gin has 0 grams of sugar. It’s best to mix it with club soda and lime instead of tonic, though, as tonic water does have sugar, often 9 grams every 100 grams of tonic!

Vodka: Another winner! 0 grams of sugar. Once again, if you’re mixing it, don’t turn your sugar-free drink into a sugar-filled one. Lime, mint leaves, or cucumber are great things to add to your vodka-soda to make it a little more flavorful.

Tequila: Winner number 3: No sugar, no carbs! Tequila shot to your heart’s delight this Christmas season. Just kidding…

Here’s a good resource into the best “keto-friendly” boozy drinks: (https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/keto/alcohol-guide).

Yes, being sugar-free, or as low of sugar as possible, takes a bit more work, but it’s worth it: Your body (and happiness levels) will thank you or it.

Think Beyond the Sugar this Hallowe’en?


First, an excerpt about Hallowe’en from Jerry Seinfeld’s old-school stand-up:

“The first time you hear the concept of Hallowe’en when you’re a kid, your brain can’t even process the information. You’re like, ‘What is this? What did you say? …Who is giving out candy? Everyone that we know is just giving away candy? Are you kidding me? When is this happening? Where? Why? Take me with you….I gotta be a part of this …I can wear that!’(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MarBVyZVe9s)

 

If you were a kid who took Hallowe’en seriously, you’re probably not going to love what I’m about to suggest about moving away from giving out free Type 2 Diabetes to kids this year…

 (In case you don’t know what I mean about the kid who took Hallowe’en overly seriously, he is the kid who started planning his costume in August. The kid who took notes each Hallowe’en—noting who gave out full-sized candy bars and who disappointed him with granola bars and tootsie rolls—to use the following year when mapping out his route to maximize candy collection. This kid was fairly discerning about who he let Trick-or-Treat with him: Less athletic friends, who wouldn’t be able to keep up with his pace, were cut from the roster, as were those who didn’t show adequate enthusiasm for the event. That’s what I mean about taking Hallowe’en seriously!)

 

If that was you, I ask you to open your mind and think beyond the full-size chocolate bar for the sake of the next generation of children and their health, because times have changed, man. Kids who grew up in the 1980s and 1990s were raised by mothers who used Campbell’s mushroom soup as a sauce for everything. Go figure, these same mothers encouraged us to use oversized pillow cases as reasonable Trick-or-Treating bags. Today, we’re living in a modern gluten-free, sugar-free, dairy-free, most definitely Campbell’s Mushroom Soup-free era. Not to mention, we have become more sensitive about allergies and food sensitivities. What does this mean for today’s generation of Hallowe’en enthusiasts? It means half their candy might just get confiscated by their health-conscious, helicopter parents anyway, so it might be time to think outside the box when we consider what to give out this year. Yes? No? Are you with me?

 

 

Here’s the thing: I think if you’re smart about it, you can give out healthier, no-sugar options on Hallowe’en that kids will be even more excited about than they are about a fun-sized Snickers bar (Why do they call it fun-sized, anyway? Isn’t it more fun to have a bigger size? Just saying). The key is to move away from handing out edible treats altogether. This way, there will be less comparing going on between a Mars bar and a homemade, gluten-free, sugar-free nut ball. 

I know what your next objection is “How much is this Hallowe’en going to cost me?” If you do it right, it doesn’t have to cost you anymore than a giant box of chocolate bars. To get you thinking in the right direction, here are 7 treats you can give out this year without murdering children’s teeth or giving them Type 2 Diabetes before the age of 15.

7. Mini Glider Airplanes: (amazon.com). Novel, fun, and they’re just under $10 for a 24-pack. If you normally give out two small Hallowe’en-sized candy bars to each child, you’ll spend about the same. Not only that, but they promote being physical. 

6. Carabiners: (amazon.com) If you get some older 12 or 13-year-old Trick-or-Treaters, carabiners are a great choice for them. Practical for all sorts of uses. A carabiner house would have been on our map as a 13-year-old!

5. Mini Flashlight: Similarly, a mini flashlight is great for the “older” Trick-or-Treaters (and the younger ones, for that matter), and they are also surprisingly inexpensive: 20 for $24. (amazon.com). Better yet, if you’re feeling extra generous, give out a flashlight on a carabiner and your house will be remembered by all who Trick-or-Treat at yours. 

4. Bouncy Balls:A pack of 50 for $50 (amazon.com). No kid of any age–or adult for that matter–would turn down a bouncy ball if offered. They’re timeless. And promote a little hand-eye coordination, perhaps?

3. Tattoos: I don’t know a 4-year-old who wouldn’t choose a tattoo over a Kit Kat bar!

2. Bubbles: See above. Younger Trick-or-Treaters especially, live for bubbles more than they do for candy.

1. Fidget Spinner: While I don’t understand the fidget spinner generation, they seem to be popular among kids of all ages, and you can buy mini ones for not much more than 50 cents each (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073HR8S3H/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=supheakid-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B073HR8S3H&linkId=83e5b71ac318e6490431fb4d85ab2e6c).

Not sold? Here’s an experiment: Put out a bowl of candy and a bowl of trinkets this year, and let the children select a candy treat versus healthy treat.. Report back!

Sleep Deprivation in the Short Term to Benefit the Long Term?


Say what? How is sleep deprivation ever a good thing? I know, it sounds counterintuitive at best—and counterproductive or even harmful at worst—but forced sleep restriction in the short term is one of the methods used in Cognitive Behavioural Insomnia Therapy, or CBiT.

CBiT 101

CBiT is a way to treat insomnia, or poor sleep, without the use of any pills or medication. Instead, it focuses on helping people build good habits and associations with their beds (and bedrooms), and uses some other interesting techniques, such as relaxation therapy, biofeedback, as well as sleep restriction and sleep deprivation to help people sleep more effectively. You can read more about CbiT here (https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/insomnia/in-depth/insomnia-treatment/art-20046677), but today we’re going to talk about sleep restriction and deprivation and how it works.

 

 

Restricting Sleep to Benefit Future You…

Often people who have trouble sleeping find themselves lying in bed awake, frustrated that they’re not falling asleep. So the idea here is to get you super tired over the course of a few nights by restricting your sleep, which then makes you more tired the following nights, and ultimately helps you develop more consistent bed and wake-up times.

It’s actually pretty systematic in how it works in practice. Here’s how to give it a go:

  • Calculate how many hours of sleep you’re averaging a night right now. Let’s say this number is 6 hours.
  • Figure out your normal, consistent wake up time (If you don’t have a ‘normal’ time, commit to waking up at the same time as much as work/life allows). Let’s say this time is 6 a.m. 6 a.m. is now your daily wake-up time.
  • Work back from 6 a.m. to calculate what time you need to go to bed to log 6 hours of sleep: This means midnight. Your new bedtime is midnight and your new wake- up time is6 a.m. (Doesn’t sound like enough sleep, right?)
  • Go to bed at midnight and get up at 6 a.m. every day/night until you experience7 days in a row of successfully going to bed at midnight, waking up at 6 a.m. and experience little to no restlessness in the night. For most people, this happens faster than people think it will because they’ll find themselves not getting enough sleep for a few days—especially if they don’t fall asleep right away at midnight—and then being more than ready for bed well before midnight the following nights. At this point, and only at this point—after you log 7 good nights of sleep—you can set your bedtime 20 minutes earlier: Your new bedtime is 11:40 p.m.
  • Repeat this cycle, changing your bedtime by 20 minutes after one week of good sleep at your current set bedtime. Pretty soon, you’ll be falling asleep at 10 p.m. and waking up at 6 a.m.—getting your 8 hours of sleep—without trouble. Or at least, that’s the hope, and that’s what those who have had success with sleep restriction via CBiT have experienced.

 

 

While we’re at it, here are 3 more tips associated with CBiT that make a whole lot of sense to me in concept:

 

  1. Lose the Clock

Many people wake up and look at their phones or clocks to see how many more hours or minutes they have until their alarm goes off. The problem here is twofold:

One:Looking at the clock makes you subconsciously more anxious about the amount of sleep you’re getting, or aren’t getting, and often makes your sleep troubles worse.

Two: Opening your eyes, picking up your phone, seeing the bright light shine in your eyes etc wakes you body up more than it would have had you left your eyes closed, your body still, and simply gone back to sleep.

 

  1. Lose the App

There’s an app for everything, as they say, and sleep tracker apps are no exception: They can tell you information, such as how many hours of sleep you log each night, how deeply you’re sleeping, how many times you stirred in the night, and how many times your body woke up completely.

Trying a sleep app once or twice might be a good idea, but becoming consumed with it can backfire, because now you find yourself even more concerned about your sleep, and should you experience a poor night’s sleep, there you are stressing and putting pressure on yourself about needing to ensure you get a better sleep the following night to make up for the bad sleep the night before. This stress and pressure can contribute to a restless, stressed out sleep. And on and on the cycle goes.

 

  1. Lose the Nap

Napping can be great, and if you’re a good sleeper who naps here and there, keep on with the naps. But if you’re struggling with sleep at night and rely on a nap during the day to get you through the week, eliminate the nap for a month and replace it with a consistent bedtime and wake up time.

At the very least check out this chart that tell you about more and less appropriate nap times for what you’re after (By the way, a 3-hour nap isn’t a nap! It’s a full-blown sleep):

 

Read more about ideal nap times here: (https://sleep.org/articles/how-long-to-nap/).

Sleep well, and report back if you decide to try short term sleep restriction and let us know about your experience.

Don’t Take a Rest Month!


Two new studies find same conclusion: Don’t take a rest month!

 

If two recent studies out of the University of Liverpool and McMaster University are true, then that old saying, “If you don’t use it, you’ll lose it” can even be taken a bit further:“If you don’t use it, not only will you lose it, but you might not even get it back!” The studies monitored regularly active and healthy people without Type 2 diabetes, who stopped working out and sat around for a couple weeks and discovered that their health markers worsened in just a couple weeks. Specifically, their blood sugar levels rose, their insulin sensitivity became worse and they gained weight. What’s even scarier is that when some of them, especially the older participants, returned to their regular exercise programs, the negative metabolic changes that had occurred in their bodies during those two sedentary weeks didn’t fully reverse themselves.

 

 

Here’s a link to the two studies:

Study 1(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29671031)

Study 2 (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29095970)

 

The magic number seems to be two weeks, especially in people 65 years old and older; they had a harder time reversing the damage placed on their bodies from those two lazy weeks. However, even past studies that looked at college-aged people showed a similar result; health markers decreased in just two weeks, but their young age allowed them to reverse the damage quite quickly. Don’t be fooled: This isn’t an excuse to not take a rest day. Rest days are crucial for your recovery. We don’t want to see you here seven days a week. But it’s certainly reason to not less yourself fall off for more than a few days at a time. And reason to continue to exercise even on your 3-week vacation this summer!

 

 

The fine line between taking much-needed rest days and losing fitness…

Sometimes your body needs more than a day off. I know when I have taken a week off here and there, I feel like I come back stronger and mentally fresh, ready to attack training again. According to science, the first thing you start to lose is your cardiovascular fitness. For a conditioned runner, for example, it might take 7 to 14 days until they start losing their aerobic capacity. This article (https://www.polar.com/blog/losing-fitness/) speaks to an exercise physiologist, who explained that a person’s V02 max (essentially how efficiently your body uses oxygen) will start to decrease after just two weeks, as well as your lactate threshold (the intensity point where your blood concentration of lactic acid starts to increase exponentially). On a similar note, another study showed that after four weeks of inactivity, endurance cyclists saw a 20 percent decrease in their V02 max, and after 12 days of inactivity, their blood enzymes needed for endurance performance had decreased by 50 percent. Also consistent with the two new studies from Liverpool and McMaster that I noted above, older people lose their endurance faster than younger people.

 

Strength loss is pretty similar. According to this study out of Coppenhagen (https://healthsciences.ku.dk/news/news2015/inactivity-reduces-peoples-muscle-strength/) from 2015, it takes just two weeks of not using your lower body for you to lose one third of your muscular strength. That being said, the Danish study looked at people who were immobilized completely, which is obviously much different than just not squatting heavy for two weeks. And yes, you might feel a little weak for a day or two if you don’t squat for two weeks, but this isn’t necessarily a negative thing. That strength will easily return as fast as you lost it. The lesson: Your body needs rest to recover, but two weeks of doing nothing is likely too much!

 

 

 Our Prescription For You:

 

Alas, our prescription for you:

  1. Show up to the gym three to five days a week as much as possible (On top of this, we strongly encourage you do get outside and hike, ski, run, swim, bike, surf, golf etc once a week when you can, and try a new sport each year).

 

  1. Listen to your body: If it tells you to take a rest day, take it. Even if it doesn’t, take at least one rest day per week.

 

  1. One or two times a year, take a full week off (or at least of an active recovery week, where you’re away from the gym), to heal any nagging injuries and reset your body and your mind.

 

  1. Avoid taking two weeks or more of sedentary living!

 

Obviously everyone is different, however, the above template is what we think is best for most people, to allow them to live a long, happy, fulfilling and independent life.

PRs Come in all Forms


Ever heard of social comparison theory? It’s a term coined by a psychologist named Leon Festiner in the 1950’s. Basically, it says we compare ourselves to others in order to determine our self worth. Never does this sound more relevant than when we look at the world today, where social media has become but a platform to show our value to others, and through their approval, to ourselves.

 

However, it’s more complicated than that, said Karen North, a professor of digital social media at the University of Southern California Annenberg. North explained that research shows that most people feel satisfied and confident if they perceive themselves to be better than two-thirds of what she referred to as their “relevant peer group.” What’s a relevant peer group? Well, let’s say you’re a high school athlete looking to get a college scholarship. You don’t compare yourself to the benchwarmers on your team who barely get to play, and you probably don’t directly compare yourself to the Olympic athletes in your sport. You compare yourself to other athletes looking to get an NCAA scholarship. And if you’re in the top third, you feel pretty good.

 

We see this all the time at the gym: People form rivalries—most of the time fun and healthy rivalries—with people at a similar level to them. You’re probably not online getting angry that you can’t finish a workout as fast as Mat Fraser or Tia-Clair Toomey, but dammit you are going to try to finish ahead of your gym rival. Seems logical, and not necessarily a negative thing; however, there’s a problem. It’s a losing battle because, as North explained, once you conquer one person or group, so to speak, you set your sights on conquering a new group! Bottom line: No matter how good you get, there will always be someone better than you. Now we’re not telling you to stop comparing yourself to others, because that’s a natural part of being human. And we’re certainly all for healthy rivalries that push people to be better, faster, stronger. But what we are asking you all to do is to stop and take the time, let’s say once a month, to write down or reflect upon YOUR PERSONAL IMPROVEMENTS and PRs.

 

 

 

If You Don’t, This Might Happen:

You finish a workout, where you lifted 10 lb. more than your best lift, or shaved two minutes off your previous time. The first thing you do is look at the leaderboard. You discover there are 10 people who finished faster than you that day. You then feel discouraged and you assume the person who had the fastest time of the day must be feeling a great little ego boost. But what you don’t know is he went 30 seconds slower than his best time and is feeling down on himself because he didn’t improve. Perception certainly is everything! The above is the perfect example of how comparison can kill joy. It’s natural to compare yourself, but if you’re forgetting to celebrate your wins along the way, no matter how small, you’re missing out on a lot of the fun. Here are some tools for you to employ you to ensure you recognize your improvements.

 

 

Write Down Your Scores, Times and Weights:

Step one: If you have no clue what your time was the first time you did a benchmark workout, then you have no way of knowing whether or not you have improved. Use an app, a notebook, or keep your numbers in your phone, but make sure you’re keeping track of your performance numbers somewhere.

 

 

Monthly and Quarterly Reviews:

Sit down and reflect, or meet with your coach each month, or at the very least each quarter, to make notes about any improvements and PRs you have made in recent weeks.

 

Recognize that PRs Come in all Forms:

Don’t just focus on your physical improvements. PRs can come in all forms. A PR can be that you showed up three times a week for six weeks straight and didn’t hit the snooze button once. Or that you haven’t had sugar in 30 days. Or that you’re finally able to put your arm overhead without pain in your shoulder.

 

Pictures Don’t Lie:

If you’re on a quest to change your body composition, take pictures and look back every few months. Chances are you have changed more than you realize.

 

Embrace the Plateau:

OK, this might be the toughest one to do mentally, but there will come a time where PRs do slow down. Even the best athletes in the world plateau. Take comfort in the fact that a plateau is part of the improvement process, too, and it’s usually the time when the biggest learning curve happens because it forces you to make small changes that can lead to big results.

Stay the course and enjoy the journey.